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Improving Your Mokai

Shop Talk => Boat Riggings and Modifications => Topic started by: CC-Coder on December 13, 2017, 11:11:47 AM

Title: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on December 13, 2017, 11:11:47 AM
Iím looking at Hummingbird and Lowrance tutorials and came across this video. Thoughts from those with a fishfinder would be appreciated.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SUhb9Z0w3Rc



https://deepersonar.com/us/kayak-fishing/?utm_source=paddling&utm_medium=banner&utm_content=kayak1&utm_campaign=fb%20%5Bus&utm_source=paddling.com+subscriber+list&utm_campaign=59be34cad2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_12_12&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f2ead8a079-59be34cad2-213172661 (https://deepersonar.com/us/kayak-fishing/?utm_source=paddling&utm_medium=banner&utm_content=kayak1&utm_campaign=fb%20%5Bus&utm_source=paddling.com+subscriber+list&utm_campaign=59be34cad2-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_12_12&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f2ead8a079-59be34cad2-213172661)
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: fairweatherfisherman on December 16, 2017, 11:08:35 AM
I spend a lot of time looking at my sonar unit. The technology has come a very long way in the last 10 years. I get the best unit on the market and replace it every 4 years or so, when a new product cycle provides enough incremental value to make it worthwhile. The 2d sonar "secret sauce" is the programming that interprets what it sees. The newer downscan sonar is more like a photograph, where you actually see what is down there. A tree looks just like a tree, not an abstract representation of a tree. When I'm fishing in the small rivers, I usually only care about depth and water temp, which a cheap unit provides just as well as an expensive one. In larger rivers and lakes that is where the more competent units pay for themselves. A somewhat less costly unit that some of my friends use a Garmin, but nearly everyone else has gone with Humminbird, unless they were already invested in Lowrance technology. Humminbird has superior customer service being the primary reason as the are "neck and neck" on the technology.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on December 16, 2017, 11:49:20 AM
I spend a lot of time looking at my sonar unit. The technology has come a very long way in the last 10 years. I get the best unit on the market and replace it every 4 years or so, when a new product cycle provides enough incremental value to make it worthwhile. The 2d sonar "secret sauce" is the programming that interprets what it sees. The newer downscan sonar is more like a photograph, where you actually see what is down there. A tree looks just like a tree, not an abstract representation of a tree. When I'm fishing in the small rivers, I usually only care about depth and water temp, which a cheap unit provides just as well as an expensive one. In larger rivers and lakes that is where the more competent units pay for themselves. A somewhat less costly unit that some of my friends use a Garmin, but nearly everyone else has gone with Humminbird, unless they were already invested in Lowrance technology. Humminbird has superior customer service being the primary reason as the are "neck and neck" on the technology.

Fairweatherfisherman, thanks for the critique of the models and especially the customer service thought. Anymore I look to that as a reason to buy things instead of customer reviews. At this point, I'll probably look towards the Hummingbird models.  I have the option of putting it on my wife's Mokai if I don't like it. Lol
After watching many tutorials, I like the idea of the down scan sonar since I'll be fishing mainly large lakes and rivers. Plus I couldn't tell a stump from a fish. Hehe
You can checkout some of my videos I posted to get a glimpse of the fun we had since picking up our boats last May in Ludowici after Tom's many upgrades.

Does the down scan sonar work through the hull?
Did you go through the hull like Tom's Hummingbird set-up?

Did you watch the YouTube link of the unit used from shore?
 
If I didn't purchase a Mokai, I would probably be very interested in that one.

Thanks again - Chuck
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: fairweatherfisherman on December 16, 2017, 12:32:15 PM
I did not go through hull. I don't think it is recommended.  I attach this:

https://www.springcreek.com/product/paddle-sports/universal-receiver/

using this so I can remove it

https://www.springcreek.com/product/paddle-sports/kayak-mounting-brackets/

and attach transducer with this

https://www.springcreek.com/product/paddle-sports/snap-on-transducer/

I didn't watch the shore thing. When I fish from the shore it is usually on very small creeks or rivers that I take the kids to fish and you can see the bottom.

If you get the down scan, get the biggest screen you can afford. The bigger the better. If just traditional sonar, a small unit works fine.

Here is one of a half dozen I caught day before yesterday. Not from the Mokai though. I also have a big jet boat.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/pHO81v.jpg)
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on June 18, 2019, 09:45:22 PM
I finally went out and bought a Humminbird Helix 5 fishfinder this week. Really wanted the Helix 7 but it looked huge for the limited space on the Mokai.
One question I have is how do I hook it up to the power supply? Please keep the terminology at a 3rd grade level. (Lol)
As far as I can tell, it would be to a cigarette lighter type in order to insert into DC adapter Tom installed. Similar to this post I found. --- https://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-forums/topic/182057-cigarette-lighter-adapter-for-fish-finder/

Pictures of whats in the box are attached.

 
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Painlesstom on June 18, 2019, 10:16:59 PM
This should make it easy for you.  \./8

https://www.amazon.com/KUNCAN-Replacement-Cigarette-Lighter-Extension/dp/B075DD6T32/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=lighter+plug&qid=1560910584&s=gateway&sr=8-3
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on June 18, 2019, 10:31:37 PM
Thanks, looks elementary as in 3rd grade-ish. Lol
Is it possible to use one of those power banks as a power supply? If I bought another power cord, is there an adapter that could be attached similar to the cigarette lighter ?
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: fairweatherfisherman on June 18, 2019, 11:15:53 PM
Iíve got a Helix 12 on my big jet boat. I run it from a separate dedicated battery to minimize interference with other electronics like trolling motor, bait tank, bilge pumps, etc. I go direct to the battery with an in-line fuse. I havenít checked the amp draw on the Helix yet, but my ONIX could pull down a battery pretty fast. Donít know what it would do for the boat performance but Iíve used the U1 AGM batteries from West Marine and bass pro shops for years. They are 32 amp hours, so would probably power you all day. They weigh 24 pounds. There are also motorcycle batteries that Iíve used for really light loads. Odyssey also makes an assortment of smaller AGM batteries. Iíve used them for bait tanks and emergency spare trolling motor batteries. I know you will love that Helix.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Painlesstom on June 18, 2019, 11:17:34 PM
If you find the right connector you can use the 12v output next to the power in jack.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on June 18, 2019, 11:43:41 PM
If you find the right connector you can use the 12v output next to the power in jack.

I thought that port might be an option. I'll probably use the cigarette lighter port you installed for me but always looking for backups. Thanks for the link and advice as always!
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on June 18, 2019, 11:52:25 PM
Iíve got a Helix 12 on my big jet boat. I run it from a separate dedicated battery to minimize interference with other electronics like trolling motor, bait tank, bilge pumps, etc. I go direct to the battery with an in-line fuse. I havenít checked the amp draw on the Helix yet, but my ONIX could pull down a battery pretty fast. Donít know what it would do for the boat performance but Iíve used the U1 AGM batteries from West Marine and bass pro shops for years. They are 32 amp hours, so would probably power you all day. They weigh 24 pounds. There are also motorcycle batteries that Iíve used for really light loads. Odyssey also makes an assortment of smaller AGM batteries. Iíve used them for bait tanks and emergency spare trolling motor batteries. I know you will love that Helix.

Thanks for the tips. If I get the 24 pound battery and catch a fish like the one you caught below, I might be swimming with the fishes.  :) 
Hope the Helix 5 can help me spot them like yours does. Been watching many YT videos on how to read the Helix and adjust the settings. Seems like a video game, just need to play with it to learn what works best.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Rottweilerman on June 19, 2019, 10:24:57 PM
Hey Chuck,  I have Ray-marine Dragonfly 5 on my Stik, and  I power it with  Nocqua  Pro Power Kit 10 Ah.  It weights 1.4 lbs. \./8
I've gone out fishing 3 times for about 4 hours each time and the battery still has power left over.   You can hunt around for the best price.  Go to www.nocqua.com and check it out.

Good Luck ,John
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on June 20, 2019, 12:08:09 AM
Thanks John, I'll look at what they offer. I see they have a retailer near my sister's place in Pa.  :)
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 01, 2019, 11:27:00 PM
Hey Chuck,  I have Ray-marine Dragonfly 5 on my Stik, and  I power it with  Nocqua  Pro Power Kit 10 Ah.  It weights 1.4 lbs. \./8
I've gone out fishing 3 times for about 4 hours each time and the battery still has power left over.   You can hunt around for the best price.  Go to www.nocqua.com and check it out.


Good Luck ,John


Hey John, thought i'd move your quote over to the original thread.
**This next comment is for CC-coder, Chuck, I used my Nocqua Pro Power battery on my fish finder another 4 hours, with power still available after docking.  I've got maybe 8 to 12 hours on the charge.
You never did say if you checked it out, or actually bought one.


Thanks for the information about the Nocqua and yes, I ended up getting one and took it out today with the new Humminbird Helix 5 for the first time. I used it for about 3-4 hours and was going to test the remaining juice with my new battery tester. (Meter)
I'll be making a video on my new fishfinder and how I mounted it. The Nocqua was easy to splice the wires to the Helix terminals and the velcro on it's case let me hang it from the Helix mounting bracket. Now, I just have to learn how to spot the fish...guess it's back to Youtube for more tutorials. Thanks again John!
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Rottweilerman on August 03, 2019, 12:36:40 PM
Hey Chuck,  Glade to hear you purchased a Nocqua.  Where weight can become an issue with the Mokai, a lighter battery for the fish finder is a plus \./8.   Let me know how many hours you go out of a charge.   Even if you have to recharge after 3 runs, its well worth it because of size and lack of weight.

John
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Rottweilerman on August 08, 2019, 06:15:17 PM
Hey Chuck,  I just measured the voltage on my Nocqua.   11.37 volts and that's after 3 trips on the Stik.  I'm not sure what that voltage equate's  to as far as hours left I'm the battery.
Did you measure your voltage after your first run?

John

Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 08, 2019, 10:21:23 PM
Hey John,
    I got a reading in the 11 range after 3 trips out too. Used it about 3-4 hours each time without turning off. Iím thinking at this rate, probably will only need to charge it once per season. Lol
The unit weighs maybe 2 lbs and not much bigger than a tea cup. Thanks again for the tip, I should get a lot of productive fishing trips for years to come.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: happul3 on August 09, 2019, 06:28:05 AM
Assuming a balanced 3 cell Li, 11.37V = 3.79V for each cell, which is 25-40% of charge left by my estimate. It is a crude, generic estimate, you'd need to get actual discharge curve to get a more accurate number or at least know  the battery type (cylindrical 18650 cells, perhaps)? 

As you may recall, the Li batteries do not like to be deeply discharged, so I'd recharge your battery once you get to below 3.7V per cell. Also, do not charge them unnecessarily often, keeping them topped-up shortens their life.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 09, 2019, 08:12:11 AM
Assuming a balanced 3 cell Li, 11.37V = 3.79V for each cell, which is 25-40% of charge left by my estimate. It is a crude, generic estimate, you'd need to get actual discharge curve to get a more accurate number or at least know  the battery type (cylindrical 18650 cells, perhaps)? 

As you may recall, the Li batteries do not like to be deeply discharged, so I'd recharge your battery once you get to below 3.7V per cell. Also, do not charge them unnecessarily often, keeping them topped-up shortens their life.

Thanks for the math lesson and reminding me of the correct charging process. I better recharge them before heading to the reservoir this weekend. 👍🏻
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 09, 2019, 10:17:27 AM
Also, I plan on using the fishfinder with battery in the house this winter to learn the settings better. When not in use for a month or more, would it be better to leave at half, or fully charge it?
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Painlesstom on August 09, 2019, 10:21:56 AM
3.7v per cell would be a good storage charge. Would not store it fully charged. So where it's at right now would be fine to leave it sit, so when you are done for the season let it run down to that.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 09, 2019, 10:51:32 AM
I see the GooLoo jump starter has similar recommendations, 60% charged for storage when not in use. But, who knows when youíll need to use the jump starter and have it fully charged? Hopefully never!
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Painlesstom on August 09, 2019, 02:43:57 PM
I've been using LiPo batteries for many years, many of them I charge and don't use for a few weeks. Haven't noticed any real problem from the practice, I wouldn't worry about it with regards to the jump start pack; when you need it, you want it as charged as possible on demand. Now with a seasonally used battery I would discharge for storage.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Rottweilerman on August 10, 2019, 01:41:06 AM
Glade to see the  battery techno giros are offering their analysis of this great little battery pack \./8.  I think it's amazing this little battery can take the place of the big ones.
I just ordered a 2020 Tracker Classic XL which has a fish finder that runs off the starting circuit when the motor isn't running, at least I think that how it's operates :).  I haven't ask that question yet.  I'm sure someone on the forum will answer that for me ::).  I may purchasing a Nocqua Pro Power and splice it into the fish finder and take the boat electronics out of the equation.

The next big decision is, do I keep my Stik Boat or let someone else enjoy.
Anyway, the Nocqua is a good find for those that want a small power pack with a good punch.

John
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: CC-Coder on August 10, 2019, 12:14:03 PM
They say it has about 500 life cycles which should get us around 4 or 5 seasons, not bad. You can buy a y-cable and add one of their lights or another battery to power a second fishfinder.  I tried 4 different lighter plugs for the GoPro and they all vibrated loose so I didnít want the fishfinder doing the same. Figure about $30 more a year to have peace of mind and maybe help land the Big one, worth it to me.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Mokai Dreamin' on August 10, 2019, 01:32:46 PM
Assuming a balanced 3 cell Li, 11.37V = 3.79V for each cell, which is 25-40% of charge left by my estimate. It is a crude, generic estimate, you'd need to get actual discharge curve to get a more accurate number or at least know  the battery type (cylindrical 18650 cells, perhaps)? 

As you may recall, the Li batteries do not like to be deeply discharged, so I'd recharge your battery once you get to below 3.7V per cell. Also, do not charge them unnecessarily often, keeping them topped-up shortens their life.
If I'm not mistaken the lithium-ion batteries are basically the same thing we use in laptop computers and cell phones. I noticed for example in my laptop, if you do not set your battery parameters so that it discharges down to 15% or so before you recharge, you will kill the battery in short order. (under a year). So the information appears to be correct to me. I've read this elsewhere on the web too, and have also experienced first hand killing batteries within a year, by just keeping them topped off, instead of allowing them to discharge more fully before charging. Problem is without some kind of a smart charger or monitor, you will probably kill the battery prematurely.

Interesting in the Mokai,  version 1 and 2 of the ES-Kape that they are using the lithium ion phosphate batteries, and essentially trickle charging them every time you use the boat via the engine charging system. If I'm not mistaken this is also going to kill the battery within about a year. I'm not sure in this instance how to remedy that as you would need to allow the battery to run down more before charging, but that would essentially mean turning the charging system off on the boat, and manually charging the battery, and monitoring yourself. 

Am I correct or missing something?
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Mokai Dreamin' on August 10, 2019, 01:44:36 PM
Glade to see the  battery techno giros are offering their analysis of this great little battery pack \./8 .  I think it's amazing this little battery can take the place of the big ones.
I just ordered a 2020 Tracker Classic XL which has a fish finder that runs off the starting circuit when the motor isn't running, at least I think that how it's operates :) .  I haven't ask that question yet.  I'm sure someone on the forum will answer that for me ::) .  I may purchasing a Nocqua Pro Power and splice it into the fish finder and take the boat electronics out of the equation.

The next big decision is, do I keep my Stik Boat or let someone else enjoy.
Anyway, the Nocqua is a good find for those that want a small power pack with a good punch.

John
Aquanami will be releasing the new version of the boat during the Miami boat show, which is February 13-17 2020. If I were in your shoes, I would move your boat soon while demand is high.    The flipside is if tariffs stay in place or are increased, the price of the current boat is  going to jump at least 10%, if not more, so this would also make a used boat more attractive to some.  I think with the features of the new boat, most  people are going to opt for a new model though.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: happul3 on August 11, 2019, 03:37:31 PM
If I'm not mistaken the lithium-ion batteries are basically the same thing we use in laptop computers and cell phones. I noticed for example in my laptop, if you do not set your battery parameters so that it discharges down to 15% or so before you recharge, you will kill the battery in short order. (under a year). So the information appears to be correct to me. I've read this elsewhere on the web too, and have also experienced first hand killing batteries within a year, by just keeping them topped off, instead of allowing them to discharge more fully before charging. Problem is without some kind of a smart charger or monitor, you will probably kill the battery prematurely.

Interesting in the Mokai,  version 1 and 2 of the ES-Kape that they are using the lithium ion phosphate batteries, and essentially trickle charging them every time you use the boat via the engine charging system. If I'm not mistaken this is also going to kill the battery within about a year. I'm not sure in this instance how to remedy that as you would need to allow the battery to run down more before charging, but that would essentially mean turning the charging system off on the boat, and manually charging the battery, and monitoring yourself. 

Am I correct or missing something?

To be fair, the recommendations not to top-up or not to discharge completely aren't meant to say that any Li battery will be destroyed quickly otherwise. They are just supposed to prolong the useful life, for example, if a battery is rated for 1000 cycles to loose 50% capacity, one might get significantly more equivalent cycles by following those recommendations. And a proper battery with a correct BMS/charger will last a long time even is one fully charges it every day. Incidentally, it is a lot harder on Li battery to do one 0<->100 cycle compared to one 80<->100 cycle  (however, five 80 <-> 100 cycles would be harder than  one 0<->100 cycle).

Unfortunately, the batteries and BMS/chargers don't always live up to their specs and might not play well together in long term. So I am not surprised that there were lots of stories of phones and other gadgets dying in months with everyday charging. I believe those were just engineered badly. Don't hear much of that for a few last years, at least, which probably means that they finally learned the lesson. Personally, I follow the charge/discharge recommendations only when it is convenient and do not sweat it otherwise. My main portable computer is discharged to ~80-90% almost everyday when I am away from AC outlet and so when I plug it in it tops up to 100%. I bought this computer about 5 years ago and the battery is still fine with this usage...

About Escape and trickle-charging LiFe battery. My v1 Escape (2014) came with regular lead battery so I can't say for sure how well the whole thing operates, but it is very easy to keep LiFe battery happy. It likely has the built-in BMS that turns charging off when the battery reaches at 100% and won't start charging until it drops below ~95%. If so, there won't be any trickle-charging even if you spent the whole day running the motor. Also, LiFe batteries have lower power storage capacity, but are safer and live a lot longer (more cycles, 3000 cycles is commonly quoted number). So even if you run everyday six months per year, I wouldn't be surprised that it lasts 10 years or longer.

Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Mokai Dreamin' on August 11, 2019, 05:34:08 PM
About Escape and trickle-charging LiFe battery. My v1 Escape (2014) came with regular lead battery so I can't say for sure how well the whole thing operates, but it is very easy to keep LiFe battery happy. It likely has the built-in BMS that turns charging off when the battery reaches at 100% and won't start charging until it drops below ~95%. If so, there won't be any trickle-charging even if you spent the whole day running the motor. Also, LiFe batteries have lower power storage capacity, but are safer and live a lot longer (more cycles, 3000 cycles is commonly quoted number). So even if you run everyday six months per year, I wouldn't be surprised that it lasts 10 years or longer.
I thought all version 1 ES-Kape's came with the Lipo batteries so it's news to me that some versions came with lead acid batteries. Perhaps the initial offered year? Anyway, not so important.

It would make sense that the battery would have some kind of a management system.  To my understanding the lithium iron phosphate/ polymer batteries can be dangerous if overcharged. I've heard of some burning violently. My point was that they're not allowed to  discharge down to 15%.  Only 5% discharge is not much different than keeping charged all the time.

My only frame of reference is my newer  laptop, which I left plugged into AC pretty much all the time. So this is a scenario where it would have shut off at 100% and probably came back on it 95%. It was dead in under a year. I've now set my battery monitor/energy saver settings to allow it to drop to 15% before it charges. So far, no issues and it's been at least another year with a new battery. It's possible there was just some fluke with that first one too.

I do feel better that this hundred dollars battery is not going to die within a year. The lightweight certainly seems ideal for the Mokai that is already so weight sensitive. An AGM lead acid battery can easily weigh 7 or 8 pounds, and  that's pretty significant in these boats.

I appreciate the response!
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: happul3 on August 11, 2019, 06:25:24 PM
If a battery pack (that includes BMS circuit, unless it is RC DIY kind) isn't defective it cannot be overcharged, plain and simple. I also wouldn't worry about burning unless one physically damages the battery (dropping, puncturing it) or overheats it (external heat or insulation) while charging. And LiFe (LiFePO4, LFP) batteries are particularly safe, haven't heard of anything violent involving them at all.
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Painlesstom on August 11, 2019, 07:44:29 PM
I agree Denis, not much to worry about with the protection circuitry. I haven't heard anything negative about the LiFe or LifePO4 yet other than price. 

Troy,

The version 1 ES-kapes that I've see came with lead acid, mine did and it was only a 4ah rating....   :D But LiPo is not the chemistry used for this application, Li-ion is what you'll typically see or Li-iron (LifePO4). LiPo batteries are a whole different animal, and those do have some volatile tendencies if not handled and charged properly. Although, they aren't as prone to burning or exploding as people claim, the abuse has to be pretty extreme.   

Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Mokai Dreamin' on August 11, 2019, 10:40:22 PM
Thanks Tom. Yes, I was confusing technologies. There are some similarities between the two from what I just read up on Wikipedia, but lithium iron phosphate appear to be the next generation. This is also what version 2 of the ES-Kape is using. Expensive little battery and only 19 oz. At least Mokai was trying to trim the weight where they could.

I thought version 1 of the ES-Kape had the same, so thanks for clearing that up. 
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Rottweilerman on August 12, 2019, 09:39:33 PM
Aquanami will be releasing the new version of the boat during the Miami boat show, which is February 13-17 2020. If I were in your shoes, I would move your boat soon while demand is high.    The flip side is if tariffs stay in place or are increased, the price of the current boat is  going to jump at least 10%, if not more, so this would also make a used boat more attractive to some.  I think with the features of the new boat, most  people are going to opt for a new model though.
Troy, The tariffs are going to effect any boats made out of aluminum as well,  Tracker indicated there'er going to increase boat manufacturing costs somewhere around $ 400 dollars per boat.
On your comment about Aquanami releasing a new boat next year,  is this going to be the new Stik, or is Austin working on something different?

As far as selling my Stik, I have to come up with a reasonable price that includes all my accessories and the trailer.   The trailer is freeway ready, so all someone would have to do is come and pick it up.    I'm working on a craigs listing. 

John
 
Title: Re: Fishfinder
Post by: Mokai Dreamin' on August 12, 2019, 10:25:19 PM
Troy, The tariffs are going to effect any boats made out of aluminum as well,  Tracker indicated there'er going to increase boat manufacturing costs somewhere around $ 400 dollars per boat.
On your comment about Aquanami releasing a new boat next year,  is this going to be the new Stik, or is Austin working on something different?

As far as selling my Stik, I have to come up with a reasonable price that includes all my accessories and the trailer.   The trailer is freeway ready, so all someone would have to do is come and pick it up.    I'm working on a craigs listing. 

John
 
My understanding from speaking to Dan this morning from Aquanami is Stik is working with Frank Rui, the original designer of the Jet Angler on a Skiff design with larger engine, but they are struggling. So, no the version being released in Feb. 2020 is not a Stik design, but rather an updated Jet angler design from Aquanami.

Dan had this to say about the new boat:

"I am sure you will like new jetAngler.

It will have much better hull, more efficient and simpler engine cooling system, better seats, fixed driving console, more dedicated storage spaces, place for coolant box and more attachment points for accessories"

No more details of what Stik is working on.  Aquanami is also working on a mini jet boat. Something about 9 feet long, but much wider (2 passenger). In design phase, so no details about that one. He is seeking feedback for design, so trying to get him to join the forum so everyone can speak to him directly.