$txt['youtube'] = 'YouTube'; $txt['youtube_invalid'] = '#Invalid YouTube Link#'; River flow rates

Author Topic: River flow rates  (Read 100 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bob38

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • Location: Tahlequah, OK
  • Cool Points: 3
  • Engine: Subaru EX21
  • Model Year: 2-2008
River flow rates
« on: November 20, 2019, 11:29:31 AM »
I have read some posts here talking about currents/flow rate and such. Just wondering if there is a general rule to follow? I can get river data online and the Arkansas River is a navigational river and I'm skeptical of trying. I just want to be safe. 

Offline Painlesstom

  • Painless Tom
  • Administrator
  • Mokai Maniac Member
  • *******
  • Posts: 5799
  • Age: 45
  • Location: Georgia
  • Cool Points: 59
  • Making Your Mokai... A Better Mokai!
    • Painless Products
  • Engine: EX21 w/17 head - ES
  • Model Year: 2003 / 2011 / 2015
Re: River flow rates
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2019, 12:36:30 PM »
Everyone would have their own comfort zone, and environment would make two rivers completely different at the same flow rate. Like a ladder, start at the bottom and work your way up to gain experience and decide your limits. Personally I've been out on my river at 15' stage which is 100 kcfs, I don't get off the main river into any sloughs where I'd be going with the current at that point either. Just have to know your boat and your limitations. Safety is #1 so if you don't feel comfortable, don't do it.  \./8
Tom

  >:D    

_________________________

www.PainlessClutch.com

Offline bizler

  • Mokai Addict Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 574
  • Age: 76
  • Location: Vancouver, WA
  • Cool Points: 46
  • Engine: EX21 W/EX17 Head
  • Model Year: 2010
Re: River flow rates
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2019, 12:42:31 PM »
Hi Bob,  I have run my 2010 Mokai on several rivers in my area, Vancouver, WA, where the water varies from flat with 3 - 4 mph currents to class 1 and 2 rapids,  without difficulty. On the Columbia, I have to be careful to avoid large wakes from cruisers and wind driven waves above about 3í. On the swift rivers, I have to judge whether or not my boat can run faster than the current in chutes and swift runs.

Going upstream is generally easier to navigate as you can often stop before you get into trouble and reassess the navigability.  Coming back downstream is not so forgiving. Standing waves below a chute can swamp your boat in a heartbeat. I would not attempt them without a windshield or, at least a splash guard. I try to aim for the eddies when possible. Also, I have learned to keep my paddle handy so that I can maneuver in the event that I lose propulsion from the engine.

Mokaiís are very stable boats having a low center of gravity. They can handle pretty heavy water when under power which enables keeping the bow high.  They tend to plow a bit at low power. I would not attempt cross the Columbia in 25 knot wind under paddle. You will build your confidence as you gain experience on the water.

Bill  ;)

Offline Bob38

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 17
  • Location: Tahlequah, OK
  • Cool Points: 3
  • Engine: Subaru EX21
  • Model Year: 2-2008
Re: River flow rates
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2019, 01:19:48 PM »
Tom and Bill

The area I'm looking to put in is below where two other rivers Minor river empties into the Arkansas River. The flow rate can vary throughout the day depending on if the dam is releasing from these two minor rivers. Currently, the Arkansas River is at 28,000 CFS. and the river I go to (Illinois river)runs about 19,000 CFS. However, the Arkansas is 1200 feet wider than the Illinois at 130 feet. Not sure if that makes any difference. I need to bring myself up to speed on how the river gauges are calibrated (if they are) to each river or if they are just a standard instrument that reads current velocity at that point. Just standing there and looking it doesn't seem to be anything menacing just a lumbering river.

Thanks for the reply