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Author Topic: Saltwater Maintenance  (Read 159 times)

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Offline Beachcomber

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Saltwater Maintenance
« on: September 18, 2019, 06:07:33 AM »
New Member, no Mokai yet, but the search has begun.  I've been reading about using the Mokai's in saltwater and the combination of Saltwater and Freshwater opportunities is what makes them so interesting for me.  Just thought I'd throw out a few tips from running aluminum boats in the salt for a while, things I'll go through when I get a Mokai  Please add your own tips or comments.

1) Rinse with Salt Away.  As others have said rinsing everything after salt water is essential.  I've been using Saltaway to rinse off my trailer, boat and engines for years now, it does seem to work really well to remove salt deposits and protect parts.  It typically comes with a garden hose mixer nozzle or could be diluted in a spray bottle.

2) Go through all electrical connections.  Any electrical connection should be made with an Ancor or similar marine grade heat shrink connector or butt splice.  Preferably with marine grade tinned copper wire.  Any connectors should be generously coated with dielectric grease, spade terminals/rings/sparkplug boots, etc.

3)Corrosion Block Sprays/Pastes:  Corrosion block sprays for all exposed metal linkages, engine parts, etc.  Corrosion Block brand makes sprays and greases for linkages.  I also really like Fluid Film, it is a very thick spray that clings well to parts and doesn't rinse off easily, I use it under the cowling on my outboards.  Tef-Gel is an anti-seize paste that stops galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and should be appplied to any metals in contact with each other, screw threads, etc. Much cheaper to buy in a small tub instead of the tiny little tube.

4) Those Honda motors are tough. They will look like crap from surface rust, but they seem to keep running.  Up here in AK they are used extensively on commercial boats to run pumps, pressure washers and hydraulic pot pullers, often on open decks subject to saltwater spray but seem to keep on ticking.  Rinse and maintain them and they should work a long time, not sure on the Subabru engines. 

Any other tips for saltwater use?

Offline Painlesstom

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Re: Saltwater Maintenance
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2019, 09:07:10 AM »
My advice... Just don't do it.

Saltwater maintenance doesn't work the same as it would a marine vessel. The engine is bare aluminum with steel shrouds and hardware, you can't rinse thoroughly enough nor is it good to consistently soak the motor down that much. The steering cable, throttle handle, all the hull hardware, would have issue with salt. I've seen and dealt with the results of such use several times and it's simply a nightmare. On a boat that has my Subaru conversion you will kill my muffler in salt conditions, my muffler needs to stay dry. It was made for freshwater only to be used with my muffler cover and salt simply isn't an option when using it.

The pumps don't like salt water either, haven't had one I couldn't rebuild yet but I've seen some that made me cringe...

Can you run and maintain a Mokai in salt water? Yes. But it's like living with cancer where the treatments just keep you going a little longer and there is no chance of remission. It will have it's way with your Mokai eventually.  :(
Tom

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Offline Beachcomber

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Re: Saltwater Maintenance
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2019, 10:36:03 PM »
Warning acknowledged but if I do get a Mokai, it will be hitting the saltwater at some point, just too much that begs to be explored up here, on the plus side it will usually go from brackish salt into fresh water sloughs and rivers or around glaciers where the upper few feet of water is still fresh water, so actual full on saltwater use will be limited.  There was a C-dory owner that used his Mokai extensively in the saltwater, actually towed it behind his boat for a few seasons up the Inside Passage and around Prince William Sound.  Had some amazing adventures and was thoroughly in love with the Mokai. 

No stranger to corrosion issues so will be cautious and feel free to tell me "Told you so" if I start complaining.

Offline Painlesstom

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Re: Saltwater Maintenance
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2019, 10:41:42 PM »
Yeah, I think his name was Jody. He is/was a member here while he had his Mokai. I think he finally sold it. Do remember he has some pretty cool videos if that's the same guy.
Tom

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Offline Maritimer

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Re: Saltwater Maintenance
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2019, 08:53:21 AM »
You've touched on a point of great interest for me. The river I mostly fish in (Miramichi) is tidal, but I'm fifty miles inland from the Atlantic at the head of tide. I never worried about salt water here, although the river does raise and lower significantly with the tide. I've been exploring areas downriver, much closer to the coast. I can't taste any salt in the water but when do I have to start worrying? I was also assuming that the salt water, being denser, would stay below a layer of fresh water and wouldn't mix as the tide came in. Is that wishful thinking? My Mokai still looks pristine, but I don't want to tempt fate.

Offline Painlesstom

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Re: Saltwater Maintenance
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2019, 09:14:58 AM »
Being 50 miles inland I don't think you have anything to worry about. I've played in tidal waters 10 miles from the coast and saw nothing to worry about. If you can't taste the salt I'd say it's ok.
Tom

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